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Pacific Coast Shark News 2014

The following reports for 2014 are provided as a public service. They are intended to inform our visitors of current shark activities along the Pacific Coast of North America. To review Pacific Coast Shark News for 2003 click here, for 2004 click here, for 2005 click here, for 2006 news click here, for 2007 click here, for 2008 click here, for 2009 news click here, for 2010 news click here, for 2011 news click here, for 2012 news click here and for 2013 click here.

 

PRESS RELEASE
Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

Should I Get a Bigger Boat? Shark Attacks on Boats, Dogs, People and Seals

Present by: Ralph S. Collier, Shark Research Committee and Peter C. Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center

Where: Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Way, Santa Barbara, California

When: Friday, August 8, 2014 • 7:00 PM

Cost: $15 (SBMM and Shark Research Committee members), $20 (non-members) Seating is Limited.

To Register: Go to www.sbmm.org or call (805) 962-8404 x115

What should you do if a shark takes a fancy to your boat? Yes, this really does happen – boats have been attacked by sharks. Find out why this happens and much more as we explore various theories on why sharks attack everything from surfboards to boats, and from crab trap floats to people and from dogs to seals. Learn what makes a shark a supremely well-adapted predator. Discover from Peter C. Howorth how attacks on marine mammals can serve as canaries in the coal mines, warning people of shark hazards, and what is being done about this.

 

Valentino's Pizza & Pasta – Shark Research Fundraiser – Family Owned and Operated. Established in 1985

Valentino's South Redondo Beach, 1308 S. Pacific Coast Highway, Redondo Beach (310) 792-1170

You're Invited to Our SHARK FIN-atic “MEET n' GREET” & SHARK RESEARCH FUNDRAISER! Valentino's Honors Discovery Channel's SHARK WEEK and local SHARK RESEARCH! Come meet RALPH COLLIER, Founder & President of the Shark Research Committee. SUNDAY, AUG. 10th From 4:00 7:00 PM. Join Us for our FUNDRAISER! Say "SNUFFY LIVES!" when you order anytime between Sunday, August 10 and Saturday, August 16  and we'll donate 10% of sales to our local Shark Research Committee! Hope to see you then! Visit their web site – http://www.valentinosrb.com/

 

Half Moon Bay   —   On July 28, 2014 Jabcob Brentjes reported the following;“At about 11:30 AM I had just put my chair down near some rock formations next to the surf, when I notice a large fish in the surf. It was thrashing trying to get back into open water. When I got a bit closer I noticed it was a small shark about three feet long. Even when large waves would come across its body, it kept trying to get closer to the beach instead of heading out. Three other people joined me and, using a stick, we tried to push the head back towards the sea, but it did not work. Then a man grabbed the tail and dragged it towards the larger waves, making sure the head was not too close. The Salmon Shark finally got the idea and took off into deep water.“ Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Santa Barbara   —   On July 24, 2014 Peter Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, reported the following;“Between 1430 and 1630 today, an old adult male California sea lion came ashore repeatedly on the sandbar at the end of the Santa Barbara breakwater.  It had been bitten by a white shark, but the wounds were infected and several days old. The wounds, though nasty, were not life-threatening. The animal had been bitten on its back twice, then on its hind flippers. From the tooth interspaces and bite diameter, I believe this shark to have been a good sized adult white shark in the 13 to 15 foot range, possibly slightly larger. Since the sea lion could have been attacked anywhere, this is an advisory only. This attack did not occur today or yesterday. The sea lion weighed 450 to 500 pounds.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

La Jolla Kelp Bed   —   On July 10, 2014 Patrick Ford was kayak fishing 1 – 2 miles offshore of La Jolla Cove in 115 feet of water outside of the La Jolla Kelp Bed. It was 5:00 PM and he had been on the water about 3 hours. Air and water temperatures were estimated in the low 70s Fahrenheit. Ford reported;“I was peddling my kayak doing a slow troll of the bait when I lost my bait. I hooked a new one on, and went to drop it in the water to resume my trolling for yellowtail. I noticed the fin of a shark out of the water swimming near me. I thought it was a sun fish and cast my mackerel at it as it approached my kayak. I realized it was a shark and immediately pulled the mackerel out of the water and sat still in the middle of the kayak as the shark made almost a full circle around me one time. It then swam along my left side for about 10 seconds. The shark did not make any aggressive movements but looked at me for a bit to check me out. It lost interest and swam away. The shark was very close (close enough to touch with my paddle) so I was able to see it very well for about 10 – 15 seconds. It was definitely a Great White Shark and had a distinct gray back and white belly that I could see were clearly separated from each other. It was about as long as my kayak, which is 14.5 feet in length. There were no seals or sea lions in the water near me, although they are normally present at this location when I fish.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Morro Bay   —   On July 8, 2014 Eric Endersby, Harbor Director, City of Morro Bay reported the following;“We received a call from a recreational fisherman on his boat about a mile offshore Morro Bay reporting an 18 foot Great White Shark circling his boat a couple times just below the surface.  Not terribly uncommon for around here.  We dispatched a patrol boat to him and, per our protocol, interviewed him to determine whether or not the sighting was credible.  It was, and we continued following protocol and posted our beaches, and because of this animal's location, advised surfers that were in the water at the time.  Normally we interview folks over the phone since most call in, but this fellow called on his marine radio to us and just gave a quick report then went silent, so we went out and tracked him down as it was just outside our harbor and only a couple boats were in the area of his initial report.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, and attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Point Dume State Beach   —   On July 8, 2014 Katy Ballard was surfing at Big Dume located between Malibu and Zuma Beach. It was a little after 11:00AM and she had been on the water about 2 hours. The sky was clear and the sea calm with very limited visibility from the turbid water conditions. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Ballard reported;“I was sitting on my board taking a break away from the majority of surfers that were just south of the point. I saw something moving to my left under the water. A shark swam alongside me to my left and then took a right towards the nose of my board – towards the other surfers. I would estimate it was 2 – 3 feet below the surface and about 7 feet in length. I got a good look when it buzzed by my board. I am not an expert so I can't be positive it was a great white, but I am sure it wasn't a dolphin or a leopard shark or anything other than a solid grey 7 foot shark. I told the other surfers and a few got out of the water. One of the surfers told me a shark was spotted in the same spot last Saturday, July 5th.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Oceano Dunes State Beach   —   On July 5, 2014 Ron Johnson was surfing 60 yards from shore at Oceano Dunes State Beach. It was 7:20 AM and he had been on the water about 45 minutes. Air and water temperatures were estimated at 60 and 57 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. The ocean was glassy calm with water visibility greater than the depth of 7 – 9 feet over a sandy ocean floor. Johnson recalled;“I was lying flat on my board, parallel to the beach facing North. Suddenly without any warning the front of my board was struck so violently that it was raised out of the water and I rolled off. I was submerged for only a second or two and when I opened my eyes I saw the head of the shark as it rolled back into the water showing its white belly. I righted my board, as it had been turned upside down during the attack, and rode it to shore. I did not see the shark again following the attack.” Johnson estimated the White Shark's length at 8 – 9 feet. Thanks to Eric Endersby and Mark Garman for their assistance in documenting this incident. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee (Photograph courtesy of Steve Fear).

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On July 5, 2014 an unidentified swimmer was bitten by a 6 – 7 foot juvenile White Shark near the Manhattan Beach Pier. The following information was provided by Eric Martin, Facility Director, Roundhouse Marine Lab and Aquarium located on the Manhattan Beach Pier;“At about 8:45AM a fisherman on the pier hooked a juvenile White Shark. He had battled the fish for about 45 minutes. The shark had taken about 200 yards of line off the fisherman's reel and was that distance North of the pier. At that same time a group of distance swimmers were also moving through the same area. It is possible that the unidentified male swimmer got his hand tangled in the fishing line, which caused the shark to strike him in the area of his rib-cage. He was assisted from the water and taken by Paramedics to the hospital. His injuries are not considered life-threatening.” Additional information will be posted when available. This incident is not an unprovoked attack but rather a special case and/or provoked. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Pismo Beach   —   On July 4, 2014 Michael Morrison was surfing with his wife, Nicole, and brothers, Justin and Joe, off Pismo Beach. He reported;“We were 200 – 250 feet into the water from the typical shoreline at that time when we saw the shark. The shark was another 50 – 70 feet from us in a south-west direction. It surfaced about 20 minutes into our surfing session. The approximate time was 9:20am. Water visibility was only a few feet, if I had to approximate I would say 4 – 5 feet, if that. We did however see dolphins in the area prior to the larger fish surface, consistently between 8:45 and 9:15am. I would estimate we saw three dolphins in the area consistently from 30 minutes to 5 minutes prior, none after the larger fish was spotted. My estimation is that the shark was 8 – 10 feet long, typical grey in color, with a dorsal fin about 12 inches high. It only surfaced for a few seconds before returning to the cover of the water. Our location was approximately 250 yards south of the Pismo Pier and the shark was heading south. I feel very positive this was a shark due to its lack of dolphin-like movement when diving under the water. The shark simply submerged from site rather than arching its back as a dolphin would when diving under the water. We have been back to that area several times in the past 3 of 4 days with no sightings.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On July 1, 2014 Rich Wright was observing the surf at 24 th Street in Manhattan Beach at about 12:00PM. The sky was overcast with an estimated air temperature of 70 degrees Fahrenheit. The ocean was calm with a slight chop. Dolphins frequent this area and are common throughout the day.Wright reported:“A 6 – 7 foot White Shark breached just past the waves as I was eating my lunch on the third story balcony of a house on the Strand. I saw the entire shark as it cleared the water's surface in flight, twisted and splashed down. I did not see what it was after but I have forty years experience surfing in many parts of the world and the shark I saw was a juvenile White Shark.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

San Miguel Island   —   On July 1, 2014 Peter Howorth, Director of the Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center reported the following;“I just got off the phone with a pinniped researcher at San Miguel Island since 1967. Apparently there's a lot of schooling fish between Cuyler Harbor and the east end of San Miguel. The sea lions, humpbacks, and sea birds are concentrated there. The sharks have discovered this as well. Usually the sharks appear about the second week of July, but they are already there, probably as part of the food web. One of the researchers, is reporting even larger numbers of sea lions bitten by white sharks, this time at the east end of the island. Last year they counted well over 300 animals attacked by sharks and this year apparently is much worse and more widespread. Sport and commercial divers are advised to avoid the area from Cuyler Harbor to the east end and to exercise extreme caution elsewhere.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Oceanside   —   On June 29, 2014 Hannah Reynolds and her Father were surfing Buccaneer Beach located South of Oceanside. It was 7:53AM and they had been on the water about 60 minutes. Air and water temperatures were estimated in the low 70s Fahrenheit. The sky was overcast and gray and the ocean glassy with a slight texture to the surface. The water was about 4 feet deep over a sandy ocean bottom. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Reynolds reported;“I was lying on my surfboard cheering my dad on a wave, when I felt the water suddenly swish on my legs. I pulled my feet up and looked on the side of my board and noticed the shark. It was 6 – 7 feet in length, dark grey on top and a wide body, maybe 2.5 feet wide. It was cruising around, yet still swimming fast. I had to paddle past it to get back to my father. I turned and saw it following me, which freaked me out. I tried to stay calm as we paddled to shore.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Santa Barbara   —   On June 26, 2014 Peter Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center reported the following;“We went out to the Santa Barbara Harbor entrance buoy this morning to check on an animal we'd heard about last night (June 25). It was readily apparent that the animal was an adult female and the wounds were fresh and had probably been inflicted yesterday or the day before. From individual teeth marks visible on the animal's left side, we believe the injuries were inflicted by a sizable white shark, perhaps 11 to 14 feet long. It's conceivable that the wounds were inflicted by the same shark seen chasing a sea lion off Leadbetter Beach last Friday (June 20), but we have no way of knowing for certain. We checked the rest of the buoys and the mooring area off East Beach but saw no other shark-bitten sea lions. I'd estimate 40 to 50 sea lions in the immediate area, however, so there are still plenty to attract another white shark“ (Photograph courtesy Peter Howorth). Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

San Onofre State Beach   —  On June 26, 2014 Dave Schulte reported the following:“I've been surfing Trail One a lot. The last two nights around 7:00PM I have seen two different Great White Sharks one about 8 feet in length and the other about 6 feet in length, both breaching just outside the surf line. There is a lot of bait in the unusually warm water. The guys down there have been seeing both of these sharks on a daily basis, but mostly outside of the surf line and showing no aggression towards any of the surfers.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Port Hueneme   —   On June 20, 2014 Roxanne Vettese was with an unidentified number of companions sailing a 43 foot vessel 3 miles off Port Hueneme, Ventura County. It was 1:58 PM with an overcast sky and fog that limited visibility to about 1 mile. The ocean was Sea State One, calm with a rippled surface and a swell of 1 – 2 feet. Water depth was recorded at 650 feet with air and water temperatures estimated at 68 and 64 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Vettesse reported; “I was helming a sailing vessel when I spotted the shark's fin, maybe 6 inches of fin showing at the surface. The juvenile Great White Shark was 7 – 8 feet in length. The shark came toward the vessel and swam along side. It did not seem to be in distress it was just swimming.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Santa Barbara   —   On June 20, 2014 Katalyn Voss and her friend Kelsey were Stand-Up-Paddleboarding off Leadbetter Point, which is located just North of Santa Barbara Harbor. It was 10:00 AM and they had been on the water 35 – 40 minutes. The sky was clear and there was a mild breeze with an air temperature estimated at 66 degrees Fahrenheit. They were approximately 700 yards from shore outside the kelp beds beyond the buoy. The water temperature was 63 – 65 degrees Fahrenheit. Voss reported;“We were heading back toward shore when we saw a sea lion swimming quickly in our direction. It was porpoising as it headed toward our location. I then saw a dorsal fin 10 – 15 inches high out of the water heading toward the sea lion. I told my friend what I had seen and we decided to head in to shore. I observed the fin following the sea lion for 5 – 10 seconds before it submerged. I frequently look behind as we paddled in to shore but did not see the dorsal fin or the sea lion again.” Mick Kronman, Harbor Operations Manager, City of Santa Barbara said;“In response to this credible sighting, City staff is posting 72-hour advisories at 22 locations on City beaches.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.  

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On June 20, 2014 Brian Beauchaine was surfing with an unidentified companion at El Porto near 40th Street in Manhattan Beach. It was 8:45 AM and they had been on the water 35 – 45 minutes. The sky was clear with an estimated air temperature of 73 degrees Fahrenheit. The ocean was calm with 2 – 3 foot waves coming in sets. The depth was 10 – 12 feet over a sandy ocean bottom with an estimated water temperature in the 60s Fahrenheit. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Beauchaine reported;“I happened to look out to see if any waves were coming in. I saw the shark lift its head out of the water for a second and then when it went back under and I saw the dorsal and tail fins. It had a broad pointed snout with a straight dorsal fin which is how I knew it was not a dolphin or porpoise. It looked to be about seven feet in length, very dark gray in coloration. Dorsal fin was straight triangle. Tail fin was about 3 – 4 inches out of the water. The girl I was surfing with said right before I saw it, she felt a swirling motion right under her and the shark came up about ten feet away. It must have swum right under her although she didn't see it. She said the look on my face was enough to tell her something was up. Other people were looking at the same spot so I assume they saw it as well, although we were the only ones who got out of the water. It didn't seem to want to bother anyone, but being my first experience with a shark while surfing, I was done for the day.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On June 18, 2014 Katrina Ling and an unidentified companion were swimming outside the breakers at Manhattan Beach. It was 8:30 AM and they had been on the water about 20 minutes. Air and water temperatures were estimated at 70 and 67 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. It was low tide and a calm ocean over water about 10 feet deep. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Ling recounted;“We were swimming South at a leisurely pace past the breakers from 30th Street Tower in Manhattan Beach towards the pier. It was very low tide so the floor was somewhat visible. When I saw a dark figure moving underneath me and to the side, I paused to look and identified it as a shark because its body was curved like the letter C. It was about 6 feet in length with a dark grey back and appeared to be searching the ocean floor, not paying attention particularly to swimmers on top. Once I notified my swimming partner we decided to swim to shore immediately. I did not see the shark follow us nor did we have any further sightings after that.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Malibu Beach   —   On June 17, 2014 Katina Zinner was swimming at Malibu Beach near Malibu Road. It was 1:20 and she had been on the water for about 20 minutes. Air and water temperatures were estimated in the upper 70s and 60s Fahrenheit, respectively. There was a 1 – 2 foot swell in water about 20 feet deep. The sky was clear with a mild breeze. There a rocky promontory that usually has pinnipeds haul out, today there were none. A lone seal was observed after she had departed the water. Zinner reported; ”I was swimming for about 20 minutes near a rocky promontory about 50 feet or less from the shore. I spent some time around a floating kelp canopy then made my way to the beach. After exiting the water I was walking back to my car when I observed a Grey Whale calf near the surf zone, about 60 feet from the beach. Three other young ladies were also watching the whale when suddenly a dark-black, triangular, dorsal fin appeared near the whale. It was at least 30 inches high, if not more. It surfaced for maybe 3 – 4 seconds then disappeared from view. We continued to watch and over the next 30 minutes the fin appeared 3 more times for a period of 3 – 4 seconds each time. I had considered swimming out to the young whale to see if I could help, but decided against that action after seeing the large dorsal fin. Upon returning home I did a search on the Internet for Killer Whale and shark dorsal fins. The fin I saw more closely resembled that of a Great White Shark than any other animal.“ Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On June 14, 2014 Kirk Aguer and an unidentified companion were surfing El Porto in Manhattan Beach. It was 10:30 AM and they had been on the water about 40 minutes. It was sunny with a mild breeze and an estimated air temperature of 75 degrees Fahrenheit. The surf was 2 – 3 feet over a sandy ocean bottom 10 feet deep with like visibility and an estimated water temperature of 67 degrees Fahrenheit. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Aguer recalled;“I was with a friend and we were sitting on our surfboards about 25 yards off the shore waiting for a wave. All of a sudden a 5 – 6 foot juvenile Great White Shark swims very slowly right by the front of my surfboard. The dorsal and tail fin did not break the water but were just below the surface. It was about 4 – 5 feet from me and continued swimming slowly in a south/east direction down the beach towards another group of surfers. I notified them that there was a small White Shark in the water and they saw it as well. The shark continued past them in the same direction and was never spotted again. Nobody got out of the water. This is the second time this year I have seen a small White Shark at this beach.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On June 14, 2014 Dennis Chavez was surfing at El Porto near the third tank at the Chevron Tank farm in Manhattan Beach. It was 9:40 AM and he had been on the water about one hour. He recorded the air and water temperature at 65 and 64 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. It was slightly overcast with a light breeze. The surf was 1 – 3 feet with lightly textured water over a sandy ocean bottom about 8 feet deep. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Chavez reported;“I was waiting for a set, sitting on my board facing South. I caught movement out of the corner of my eye and looked down to my right to see a large Great White Shark about two feet from my right leg, a couple of feet below the surface. It was longer than my 8 foot board and extremely thick body. I froze while the animal slowly swam by me to the South, angling off shore after passing me. I told another surfer who was about 20 feet behind me what had happened as the shark must have swam right by him. We both watched its shadow move along the surf line towards another group of surfers about 40 yards to the South. I called out and informed one of the surfers about the animal, but they took no action and did not seem to see it. The surfer that was behind me said ‘I don't need this' and paddled in. I stayed out for about 20 minutes, till I felt an unusual bump, as a swell passed under me that almost knocked me off my board, forcing me to lay flat to keep from toppling off. I looked around to see if there was anything near me, and saw nothing; no ripples, shadows, or anything that could have caused it. I was already spooked from the earlier encounter and paddled in for the day.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On June 9, 2014 David McNeary was surfing near 34th Street in Manhattan Beach. It was 9:45 AM and he had been on the water 1 hour and 45 minutes. The sky was overcast with an estimated air temperature in the 70s Fahrenheit. The surf was 1 – 3 feet clean with the water 4 – 5 feet deep over a flat sandy ocean bottom that was easily seen from the surface. There was a kelp canopy 10 – 20 yards West of his location and a small pod of 8 – 10 dolphins 50 yards Northwest of his location. The dolphins had been swimming back and forth throughout the morning.  However, at about 9:30 AM they stopped swimming back and forth and began circling a kelp canopy. This continued for approximately 30 minutes. McNeary recalled;“I was paddling into a right, heading Southeast as I stood and turned into the wave. I observed a dark grey, 5 foot shark directly below me, heading Southeast and toward the shore at a steeper angle than I had taken. The shark was on my right headed to shore in more of a slightly straight line, I crossed over him. As the shark turned, I could see the white underbelly. The shark appeared to be moving slowly and not alarmed by me at all. I took the opportunity to get out of the water at the end of that ride. I was a little spooked. I did not see the shark again. I informed the lifeguard but he did not seem to express much alarm.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Santa Barbara   —   On June 8, 2014 Peter Howorth, Director, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center reported the following;“At 0930 hours this morning, a shark was sighted approximately 30 feet offshore, inside of the red buoy closest to Santa Barbara (Leadbetter) Point, just outside the breakers. It was following or chasing a seal or sea lion, which apparently escaped. City employees who interviewed the witness believed this was a credible sighting. I covered Leadbetter Beach from the yacht club to the point then went as far as Thousand Steps in case the seal or sea lion had been injured. I did not find anything. The harbor patrol checked offshore, warning two kayakers and a stand-up paddleboarder. They also checked the harbor entrance buoys for any injured sea lions but saw none. After interviewing the witness, I concluded that it may have been a sea lion rather than a seal because of its behavior. The description of the dorsal fin, the behavior of the shark and the fact that it was very close to shore leads me to believe that it was likely a juvenile white shark. While observing the shark the witness observed the head to emerge at one point, not to the tip of the snout, but where the eyes were. The distance from the top of the head to the dorsal was estimated at 3 feet. Allowing for the extra distance to the snout and some error in estimating that measurement, this would still place the shark in the 7 to 9-foot range. The authorities have closed the beach to water activities for 24 hours.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Turtles   —   On June 7, 2014 Dena Austin Miller was surfing Turtles to Barney's located South of Swami's near Encinitas. It was about 5:00 PM and she had been on the water about 30 minutes. It was primarily sunny with a few high clouds and an estimated air temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The ocean was calm with the surf 1 – 2 feet inside and an estimated water temperature of 66 degrees Fahrenheit. The depth was about 10 feet over a grassy reef with water visibility greater than the depth as the bottom could be seen easily from the surface. Kelp beds are present about 120 yards West of this location. No marine mammals were observed in the area and, excluding one small fish, the area was void of marine life. Miller reported;“Surfing inside rollers at Barneys laughing and having a blast, I looked South to Turtles where my teen son Tim was surfing with his bud Shawlin only to see a shark's dorsal fin. At first I thought it was a water craft some kids must be messing around with. It looks like something sideways, moving from the Southwest just South of the Tin Shed up on the cliff, way inside, about 45 – 50 feet from the sand. What set me up for the mental awaking was the wave rolling in just outside of the surfacing fin it put perspective to the drag behind the fin and the straight Northeast direction it was moving. It was up moving rapidly about 3 seconds. I just about flung myself sideways in shock at the size of the grey fin, about 20 inches at the base. I see dolphins all the time in Del Mar, between 11th and 15th Streets. I've seen them swim under my board and in waves with me and dolphins move way different than what I saw. It was a big fin, I've had Big dolphins in arms length and there fins could not touch this in size. So I'm wiggling on my board saying to those around me...did you see that...that's a shark, and everyone was chill. So now I'm looking at my friend Misty whose North 20 yards of me and it surfaces again for a much shorter time, maybe a couple of seconds. Misty said that's a dolphin and a veteran surfer said nope that's not a dolphin. I paddled South to Turtles and said to my son and friend get out of the water, there's a shark and let's sit out for 10 minutes to see if we can see it again. We did not see the shark again so resumed surfing.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Limekiln State Beach   —   On June 6, 2014 Erik Allen, Jon O., Dave H., Gene H., and Richard R. were kayak fishing 4 miles Northwest of Limekiln State Beach near Big Sur in Monterey County. It was 9:30 AM and they had been on the water about 60 minutes paddling to their favorite fishing location. It was overcast and cool with little or no wind. The ocean was calm with 2 foot swells at 6 – 7 second intervals in water about 80 feet deep. The water had a recorded temperature of 56 degrees Fahrenheit with about 15 feet of visibility. Allen reported;“The guys had left several minutes prior to my departure and were headed to our fishing grounds a little more than 4 miles away. Jon was at least 200 yards ahead of me and was pretty close to the other guys. I noticed a sea lion swimming quickly towards me from their direction. I thought that was weird but there are sea lions everywhere out here. I heard a small splash behind me and turned my head around to see a HUGE dark grey spot and a dorsal fin about 4 – 5 feet behind my kayak. Having studied Marine Biology I knew it wasn't a dolphin. I turned back around and saw the tail as well as the dorsal fin. My heart sank because I knew it was a Great White Shark and it was huge. I calmly put my paddle on top of my head and loudly shouted to the guys ‘Help! Hey, help. I have a Great White behind me.' Even though they were more than a hundred yards away, I could hear them clearly say ‘Oh %*#*!' I turned back around and the shark's nose was about 6 inches from the back of my kayak. Even though I wasn't paddling, it somehow managed to stay right behind me...pacing me. This went on for a minute, even though it seemed like forever. Then I looked back and noticed that now a second, smaller, Great White Shark was behind me as well. At this point I was like, ‘Really?' I loudly shouted ‘Guys there are 2 Whites here now. Get over here please.' I looked to my right and noticed the bigger shark had moved next to my kayak. Its head was maybe 2 – 3 inches from the right edge of my yak. I saw every detail on its skin, including the ampullae of Lorenzini pores. It just sat there and stared at me with its HUGE, all black eye for about a minute. It just hovered next to me. We stared right into each other's eyes and then I literally told it, ‘I know this is your ocean and I respect you. Please leave me alone so I can see my family again.' About 15 – 20 seconds later, it decided to move on. As it swam up to the front end of my kayak, I looked back because I wanted to see how big it was. Its nose was at the front and there was still several feet before the shark ended and my kayak is almost 15 feet long. About 2 hours later, Dave, Jon and I were fishing about 40 yards outside of the kelp stringers. I look over and saw a fin about 80 – 100 yards away. I told Dave, ‘Are you kidding me... there they are again.' We saw the fins turn towards our direction and then the fins submerged. That was our signal to get out of there. We bee-lined it for the kelp and made it there safely. We never saw the sharks again. Later I found out that from their view, my friends said the big shark was about 20 feet long and that the dorsal fin was taller than me when I was sitting in my kayak. The other shark was roughly 12 – 14 feet. They told me the smaller shark was the shark that was chasing the sea lion I saw jumping away from the guys. Dave said the shark was chasing the sea lion then turned and made a run at him. It dove down about 25 yards before his kayak. I guess the smaller shark made the turn and joined the bigger shark at my kayak.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Sunset Beach   —   On June 5, 2014 Robert Nicolas was surfing at Sunset Beach in Orange County near Tower 22. It was 12:30 PM and he had been on the water about 30 minutes. The sky was clear with a brisk onshore breeze and an estimated air temperature of 78 degrees Fahrenheit. The surf consisted of small waist high sloppy wind swells over a sandy ocean bottom that was 6 – 8 feet deep with an estimated water temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Nicolas reported;“I was sitting on my board between sets and I saw a triangular black dorsal fin moving very slowly about 25 yards out from me. It vanished quickly and did not reappear. I hoped it was a dolphin as they are usually present in numbers at this beach. I paddled north as it looked like whatever I saw was swimming south. About 2 minutes passed when to my left (south) about 50 yards further out I witnessed the shark come almost completely out of the water. I got a pretty good look at it and could see the familiar shape of a shark. It was 8 – 10 feet in length, dark on top with a white bottom, a typical shark snout and very thick body. Not at all like a dolphin.“ Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On June 1, 2014 Amanda Schmitz, of Chica Surf Adventures, was surfing at Manhattan Beach near Tower 45. It was 10:00 AM and she had been on the water about one hour. It was sunny with air and water temperatures in the 60s Fahrenheit. The ocean was calm with water visibility greater than the 6 – 10 foot depth as the sandy bottom could be seen clearly from the surface. No marine mammals or fish were observed in the area. Schmitz reported; “I was in the water for an hour and I heard people talking about seeing two sharks. I watched as a number of surfers would cautiously swim away from the sharks, but they continued to surf for at least 20 minutes. The sharks seemed to be hanging out. There were no erratic movements by the sharks but they were fairly active swimming around the surf line. Quite honestly, I have friends who surf there and see them every day, but not the larger one of the two. I saw a l arge dorsal fin swimming through several wave sets towards and under surfers in shallow water. A separate dark clear shadow of the shark was seen multiple times close to shore. The sharks were never together; in fact they were far apart. The smaller shark was maybe 6 – 8 feet in length and the other easily 10 – 12 feet in length, maybe more. It looked like the size of a car from above. One swam underneath a bunch of surfers straight towards me and the other swam past me about 10 feet away with its dorsal fin above the water. The bigger one definitely spooked me out a little just because of its size. It wasn't so much that it was long but it was such a big creature all the way around.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On May 30, 2014 Michael Dolan was surfing at El Porto in Manhattan Beach. It was 7:20 AM and he had been on the water about 50 minutes. The sky was cloudy to the East and clear to the West with an estimated air temperature of 63 degrees Fahrenheit. There were 2 – 3 foot waves at 9 seconds with the depth in excess of 15 feet and an estimated water temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Dolan recounted;“I live in the area and surf this location at least 3 times per week, so I am very familiar with the 7 – 9 foot juvenile Great White that has been seen frequently in El Porto lately. The Great White I saw today was substantially larger, both in length and especially in girth. I had been in the water since 6:30 AM and much of the time was spent sitting on my board as the swell was disappointing. I was approximately 30 yards from shore. While sitting and chatting with a fellow surfer, a Great White jumped completely out of the water, no more than 20 yards away, and northwest of our position in front of 43rd Street. The shark's entire body was out of the water, so it was possible to more accurately gauge its size and discern its characteristics and it was definitely a Great White. I would estimate it to be at least 12 feet, possibly larger. Unlike the juvenile, which has been frequently coasting these waters, this one had a substantial girth. While I am accustomed to seeing smaller sharks in the water, the size of this one was truly alarming and I have never seen anything like it during the nearly 3 years I have lived and been surfing here. I began paddling in and another surfer slightly closer to the shore, who did not see the jump, was alarmed as he just saw the tail of a ‘really big' shark swim close to his board.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On May 29, 2014 Claudio Tona reported the following;“I went to Manhattan Beach at 5:30 PM to check out the waves. I was parked South of Tower 45. As I watched a set of waves come in I saw a shark ‘fly' out of the water and belly land about 10 yards from the line up. It was not large, maybe 4 – 5 feet in length and I can't say what type of shark. Also, I do not know if any of the surfers in the water saw the shark breach.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Capitola   —   On May 26, 2014 Daniel Garcia was surfing the "Hook" in Capitola, a city in Santa Cruz County on the coast of Monterey Bay. It was 7:00 PM and he had been on the water about 10 minutes. The sky was clear with an estimated air temperature in the mid-60s Fahrenheit. It was high tide with the ocean swell about 3 feet with limited water visibility and an estimated temperature in the upper 50s Fahrenheit. Two sea otters and one sea lion were observed in the area prior to the encounter. Garcia reported;“I was just sitting on my board when I saw the shark swim about 3 feet under me. It was light grey in color and about 6 feet in length. After it passed beneath me it swam straight for about 10 feet then quick turned to the left and disappeared.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Carlsbad   —   On May 15, 2014 Stephanie Burroughs reported the following;“I had walked down to Robert E. Frazee Beach near Tamarack Surf Beach in Carlsbad with my daughter Holly. Around 5:45 PM, I looked out about 250 yards, or a little more, and thought I was looking at a bird. The bird wasn't moving or flying away and was in the shape of a triangle. The triangle started moving methodically in a slow right and left motion and moving south. I then realized I wasn't looking at a bird but a shark fin. I watched the fin move for about 15 minutes. The fin was large and rectangular, and dark grey. My daughter and several people on the beach saw this as well. There was a dark shape in the water, murky though due to the wildfires. When I came home, I ‘Googled' the image of a Great White Shark fin, and the fin I saw looked identical to the Google image of a Great White Shark fin. I must say I have never seen this type of thing since I moved here in 1985. I was actually terrified. I'm an avid ocean swimmer.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On May 15, 2014 John Kresich was surfing at Manhattan Beach. He reported the following;“It was 9:15 AM with a clear sky and a very warm air temperature. The ocean was glassy calm with small surf and a water temperature in the low 60s Fahrenheit. The bottom was 5 – 7 feet deep and could be seen easily from the surface. Other surfers reported seeing schools of baitfish and a few bat rays in the area. Several dolphins had been observed in the area. I was sitting on my board about 35 yards off shore from the beach, facing west toward the incoming waves. I was slightly north of the 45th tower located at north end of El Porto in Manhattan Beach.  Another individual was paddling out when a 6 – 7 foot White Shark was observed heading directly towards shore about 3 yards north of me and between the guy paddling out. The shark was cruising at a slow speed, slightly under the surface. I believe it was looking for fish near shore. Two of us had a good look at shark. I've seen one before at Trail One in San Onofre and have a good understanding of the shark's distinctive characteristics. Most of us continued to surf, and we did not see it the rest of the session.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On May 13, 2014 Journalist Kevin Cody, Easy Reader News, reported the following;“After hearing reports from fellow surfers of a Great White in the water in front of his Manhattan Beach home, photographer Gus McConnell went shark hunting Tuesday morning. It didn't take him long to verify the reports. ‘A neighbor was about to go surfing at 44th Street yesterday when some guys coming out of the water said there was a shark swimming around. She didn't go out. A few other friends had mentioned sightings, so I figured they were hanging around,' McConnell said. He paddled out on a prone paddleboard with a mask, snorkel and Pentax water camera. After not seeing sharks at 44th Street, he paddled south, seven blocks to Rosecrans Avenue. There he saw a solid six-foot shark and took several photos of it. But the photos weren't clear because the water visibility was not good and he quickly lost sight of the shark. ‘So, I paddled back to 44th Street and got lucky. A five-to six-foot shark was circling the surfers, not more than 25 yards from shore. Unless the one at Rosecrans followed me, I think this was a different one,' said McConnell. He paddled after the shark with his left arm while holding his Pentax under water and shooting with his right arm. ‘The surfers were looking at me like I was crazy, but the shark was acting docile. If I reached down I could have grabbed his tail fin, but I didn't want to push my luck.' McConnell said that based on the shark's white belly, girth, and length — which he estimated to be that of an adult human — he believes the shark was a juvenile great white, though whites and makos are difficult to distinguish when they are young. Sharks generally eat fish and not mammals until they reach the nine-to ten-foot range." Photograph by Gus McConnell. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Montecito   —   On May 5, 2014 Peter Howorth, Director of the Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, reported the following;“This morning a sub-adult elephant seal, about 7 feet long and weighing a few hundred pounds, was discovered at the base of Eucalyptus Lane in Montecito, Santa Barbara County. It had a bite from a small white shark on its side in the rear. I don't think the bite was fatal. It may have been inflicted after death. A smaller bite, possibly from a blue shark, was on the other side, along with numerous holes, probably from scavengers. The animal had been dead about a week, so it could have drifted in from anywhere. Considering this, there's no way of telling where it had been bitten or how far it went before drifting ashore.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On April 30, 2014 Matt Agnitch was surfing about 40 yards from shore at El Porto in Manhattan Beach. It was 8:00 AM and he had been on the water about 40 minutes. Several dolphins were observed in the area prior to the encounter. Agnitch reported;“I was paddling out to catch a set that was coming in when I saw a grey fin protrude from the water about 20 yards from me. Based on the triangular shape, I thought it was a shark. About 30 seconds later I spotted another fin, but this one surely resembled a dolphin fin. After seeing this I decided to stay out, since I assumed that maybe my eyes had deceived me and the previous fin just belonged to a dolphin. About 20 minutes later I saw two other surfers paddling in and saying that they had a shark swim under them. They estimated it was about 10 feet in length. I decided to call it a day and when I later talked with them their description would lead me to guess it was either a Great White or Salmon shark.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Hermosa Beach   —   On April 30, 2014 James Vakula was surfing at Hermosa Beach near 25 th Street. It was about 8:00 AM and he had been on the water about 30 minutes. The sky was clear with a mild breeze and an estimated air temperature of 74 degrees Fahrenheit. The ocean was calm and glassy over a sandy ocean bottom about 10 feet deep with like water visibility and an estimated temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Vakula reported;“There were more fishermen than normal on the beach and when I started paddling out I was seeing small schools of baitfish, maybe 15 – 25 in each school. I am not sure if they were sardines or something else about that size. After about 30 minutes of surfing I had just finished paddling past the line up still facing out to sea. When I went to sit up on my board to wait for the next set I noticed a large shape reflecting sunlight in the water. It was about 10 feet in front of me and slightly to the right. I remained in paddling position and observed what appeared to be a tope/school shark 4 – 6 feet in length about 3 feet under the surface swimming slowly north to south. I was definitely able to clearly see its head and distinctive, low angled tail. I watched it for another 5 – 10 seconds or so until it veered out of my site out to sea. I was catching my last wave before going to work. A set showed up about 45 seconds later and I rode it in.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Manhattan Beach   —   On April 28, 2014 Manolo Langis was surfing at El Porto in Manhattan Beach. It was 10:30 AM and he had been on the water about 30 minutes. The sky was clear with an estimated air temperature of 72 degrees Fahrenheit and little or no breeze. The sea was calm and about 6 feet deep over a sandy ocean bottom with an estimated water temperature of 62 degrees Fahrenheit. Several dolphins were observed in the area about 30 minutes following the encounter. Langis recalled;“I was sitting on my board, making gentle strokes to slowly move deeper in the lineup, when I saw this big dark shadow closing in on me. I would say a good 8 foot juvenile Great White Shark swim straight under my board, about 5 feet below. Felt like it looked at me and continued on. It basically cruised along the full lineup, scary stuff, but continued to surf – a few other people around my location saw the shark as well. Lifeguards showed up in a boat not long after to try to locate perhaps from previous report, or maybe the shark is tagged.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Santa Cruz   —  On April 18, 2014 Eric Chin and his son were surfing at Pleasure Point, O'neills at 38th Avenue, Santa Cruz. It was about 10:45 AM and they had been on the water 1.5 hours. The ocean was calm with 2 – 3 foot waves over a reef. The water temperature was estimated at 57 degrees Fahrenheit with limited water visibility due to a plankton bloom. The sky was clear with an estimated air temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Several seal pups and sea otters were observed in the area. Chin reported:“My son was surfing the inside break so I grabbed his 9'0 Strive longboard and paddled to the outside peak. I caught a nice 2 foot wave and road that into the beach. I paddled back out to the peak and sat calmly looking at the horizon. It was a crystal clear sunny day with great visibility. I scanned the horizon for the next set. At that time, I saw a large dark colored shark breach completely out of the water about 100 yards from the peak. The shark was about 8 – 9 feet over the water, and horizontal to the ocean, and the dorsal fin was flapping back and forth. The nose of the shark descended about 10 degrees lower and the shark slammed back into the ocean and splashed down with a lot of spray. The entry was NOT nose first and clean like a dolphin, but more like that of a whale's breach. I have sailed since I was three, and surfed for the past 15 years in Santa Cruz. I am an avid fan of sea life, and know with extreme confidence that this was a shark breaching. I cannot be 100% confident it was a White Shark, however, the length, 10 – 12 feet, and the girth of the shark leads me to believe it was a Whitey. I have heard that Blue Sharks and Makos breach, but the volume and size of this fish was tremendous. It was a moving experience, and gorgeous moment. There were three other longboarders near me and I yelled "woah, shark breach, did you friggin' guys see that?" No one caught the breach. However a few guys muttered and paddled in. Everyone else stayed in the lineup. It was a truly stunning sight, and one that I will remember for life. The sheer beauty of the shark was awesome. We all stayed out and surfed another hour or so, then went in as the flood tide was starting to slow down the waves.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

San Onofre State Beach   —  On April 15, 2014 Frederik Boll was surfing with four unidentified companions 50 yards from shore at San Onofre State Beach, Trail One. It was 6:00 PM and he had been on the water about one hour. The sky was partly cloudy with the estimated air temperature 70 degrees Fahrenheit. The sea was glassy and calm with very poor water visibility of only 2 feet and an estimated water temperature of 57 – 60 degrees Fahrenheit. A single pinniped was observed about 30 minutes following the encounter with “small schools of baitfish jumping once in a while.” Boll reported;“We were sitting on our boards approximately 50 yards out. In between sets we noticed some water churning about 10 yards further out than our location and then saw the dorsal and caudal fin. The shark stayed in that location for a couple of minutes. I asked the other surfers if we should go in but they said that they see them all the time in this area so we all stayed out. About 10 minutes later when I was paddeling back out I saw it again as it cruised by my board. It was about 6ft long and girthy. It looked grey from my vantage point which leads me to believe it was a salmon shark or a small great white. It cruised around the lineup for 10 – 15 minutes then disappeared and wasn't seen again.” California Grunion spawns are frequently associated with the appearance of juvenile White Sharks at Southern California beaches. The Grunion spawn was anticipated to begin on the 15th and end on the 18th of April. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Long Beach, WA  On April 7, 2014 Paul Holmgren reported the following;“While on vacation at Long Beach, Washington, located about 5 miles North of the Columbia River in South-Western Washington, I came upon an adult Sea Lion dead on the beach. It had several wounds that were located toward the rear of the animal and two long slices that were slightly less than a foot in total length but were at least 5 or 6 inches deep. There were several smaller cuts near the hind flippers. The wounds were recent, probably less a day old (Photograph courtesy of Paul Holmgren).” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

San Francisco  On March 25, 2014 Federal U.S. District Judge William Orrick III of San Francisco, upheld California's ban on possession or sale of shark fins, rejecting claims that the law discriminates against the Chinese community – where shark fin soup is a traditional delicacy – or interferes with federal management of ocean fishing. The California law, passed in 2011, took full effect in July 2013, when the possession of shark fins became illegal. It was challenged by Bay Area organizations of Chinese American businesses and by shark fin suppliers, who argued that the legislation targeted the Chinese community and exceeded the state's authority to regulate fishing. The Federal Government changed its position after discussions with California Fish & Wildlife officials. It said the two laws could be harmonized, with federal regulations governing shark fishing and the stricter California rules applying within the state. Orrick said, “The state law would have more of an effect on the Chinese American community than it would elsewhere, but federal courts require proof of intentional discrimination to overturn a law, and there was no such evidence in this case. People of Chinese origin or culture undoubtedly overwhelmingly comprise the market for shark fin. However, a law is not unconstitutional simply because it has a racially disparate impact." In his decision Orrick said,“The law applies equally throughout the state and was based on legislative findings that the California shark fin market boosted the market for shark finning, which was contributing to the decline of a species critical to the health of the ocean's ecosystem.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Carpinteria  On March 24, 2014 Peter C. Howorth of the Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center reported the following;“A badly decomposed head and part of the shoulder of what appeared to be a very young elephant seal was discovered at the Tarpits in Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County. Based on the decomposition, I believe the animal had been dead from 1½ to 2½ weeks with the attack taking place almost anywhere along the near coast.” Wound dimensions are consistent with a white shark 10 – 12 feet in length. This incident is posted to keep you informed of shark activity in the Carpinteria area. Caution should be exercised when utilizing this location for your favorite ocean sport. This location was extremely active, reporting many white shark interactions with pinnipeds during 2012 and 2013. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Goleta Point  On March 13, 2014 Peter Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center, reported the following; “A sub-adult northern elephant seal washed ashore near the mouth of the lagoon at Goleta Point in Santa Barbara County. It had two large bites, one around its neck and the other farther back near the shoulder. It also had bites around the hind flippers. The specimen was in an advanced state of decomposition and probably died 1 ½ to 2 weeks ago. From the wounds, I think it's very possible that the shark killed the seal because of the location of the large bites on the neck and shoulder. Had the shark been scavenging, it would more likely have fed on the carcass without selecting such places to bite.” Examination of the wounds clearly show individual tissue bridges along the periphery of the two distinct bites to the neck and head of the seal. Interspace Measurements of these bridges is consistent with a juvenile white shark 7 – 8 feet in length. This report is ‘old news', however because of the relevancy of juvenile white sharks attacking adult pinnipeds along the Pacific Coast. Peter Howorth reported several similar events in 2013 and 2012. Historically, observed wounds on pinnipeds were inflicted by sub-adult and/or adult white sharks, more than 10 feet in length. Whether this is a new hunting strategy for juvenile white sharks, or simply an event that was never, or seldom, observed before, is unknown. We will continue to monitor these unique predatory events of juvenile white sharks. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Wall Beach/Vandenberg Air Force Base   —  On March 9, 2014 Peter Howorth, Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center reported the following;“A juvenile northern elephant seal was attacked north of Wall Beach on Vandenberg Air Force Base.  Wall Beach is just north of Surf Beach. It would appear the seal was struck by a white shark. The seal was a weaner, which is a newly weaned seal. It had a very large bite out of the area just forward of the pelvis, a slash on the left side that peeled away skin and blubber, and a head wound. It has been reported that a surfer saw the attack, and from description of the event it sounds like a predatory attack rather than an investigative bite. A Vandenberg official called and said they'd closed the beach for 72 hours. It was scheduled to open either on the 11th or 12th (Photograph courtesy Paul Stark, SBMMC).” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Salmon Creek Beach   —  On February 17, 2014 Kris Wienski reported the following;“I was jogging on the beach at South Salmon Creek, Bodega Bay about 200 yards North from the end of the beach where it turns to rock and Bodega Head and spotted this buoy rolling around in the high water line. Its condition caught my eye so I grabbed it for a closer look. It looked like it had a better story than the rest of the buoys that wash up on the beaches so I took it home to find out. The sky was overcast and the waves were 4 foot with a strong NW wind. The buoy was connected to about 30 feet of line. A few baby seals were observed calmly wading around in the shallows.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

San Onofre State Beach   —  On February 17, 2014 Julie Holmes was Sand Up Paddleboarding at Trail One, San Onofre State Beach. It was 1:15 PM and she had been on the water about 30 minutes. The sky was clear with an estimated air temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The sea was calm with the water 20 – 30 feet deep over a sandy ocean bottom with rocks scattered throughout the area. Water visibility was about 10 feet with an estimated temperature of 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Holmes reported;“I was sitting about 15 feet from another surfer to my left with about 6 to my right waiting for a set to come in. I looked down when I noticed something swimming toward me. I realized it was a shark and it swam alongside me, which is how I figured out what it was and it's length. It was a juvenile white shark about 7 feet in length. It looked right at me and when I said ‘There's a shark right here,' it turned toward the surfer to my left and then it swam away and disappeared. It was swimming slowly and just seemed to be checking us out. No one exited the water. I surfed for another 30 minutes and got out. Shark wasn't spotted again.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Worldwide Shark Attacks 2013

As the Director of the Global Shark Attack File the following Shark Attack data was confirmed and authenticated for 2013. It is provided as a public service to emphasize the rarity of these interactions when the number of ocean users, their total contact hours on or in the water is reviewed and compared to other hazards humans face in their daily lives. Additional information is available at; www.sharkattackfile.net .

Ralph S. Collier
Director
Global Shark Attack File

World
The Global Shark Attack File (www.sharkattackfile.net) reported 116 shark attacks worldwide during 2013, with 19 considered provoked or doubtful shark involvement leaving 97 unprovoked shark attacks, including 13 fatalities. The 97 attacks were distributed as follows; United States 53 (2 fatal), Australia 13 (2 fatal), South Africa 6 (1 fatal), Bahamas 5, Reunion 3 (2 fatal), Jamaica 2 (1 fatal), Brazil 2 (2 fatal), French Polynesia 2, New Zealand 2 (1 fatal), Guam 1 (fatal), Diego Garcia 1 (fatal), Mexico 1, Belize 1, Seychelles 1, Philippines 1, Taiwan 1, Kiribati 1, and New Caledonia 1.

United States
There were 59 interactions between sharks and humans reported from the United States in 2013 with 6 either provoked, special circumstances, or doubtful shark involvement leaving 53 authenticated unprovoked shark attacks, which includes 2 fatalities from Hawaii. The 53 attacks were distributed as follows; Florida 24, Hawaii 16 (2 fatal), California 4, South Carolina 4, North Carolina 1, Oregon 1, Texas 1, New Jersey 1, and Alabama 1. Activity of the victims were; Surfing/Boogie & Paddle Boarding/Kite Surfing 26, Swimming/Standing/Wading/Fishing 21, Diving/Snorkeling 4, and Kayaking 2.

 

Pacific Coast Shark Attacks During 2013

There were 5 authenticated unprovoked shark attacks reported from the Pacific Coast of North America during 2013. There were 4 attacks recorded from California and 1 from Oregon. The attacks were distributed in the following months; June (1), August (2), October (1) and November (1). Activities of the victims were; 3 Surfing, 1 Kayaking, and 1 Swimming. The Great White Shark, Carcharodon carcharias, was positively identified or highly suspect in 4 of the 5 attacks, with a juvenile Salmon Shark, Lamna ditropis , the suspected causal species for the attack on the swimmer.

The publication “Shark Attacks of the Twentieth Century” authenticated 108 unprovoked shark attacks from the Pacific Coast between 1900 and 1999. The Great White Shark was implicated in 94 (87%) of the 108 confirmed attacks with an annual average of slightly more than one shark attack per year. The 5 cases reported for 2013 brings the total number of unprovoked shark attacks occurring along the Pacific Coast during the 21 st Century to 77. This is ‘three times' the Twentieth Century annual average of slightly more than 2 shark attack per year during the period 1950 – 1999. The Great White Shark was positively identified or highly suspect in 67 (88%) of the 77 attacks recorded during the 21 st Century. From 2000 to the present, 38 (49%) of the 77 confirmed shark attacks occurred during the three month period of August (12), September (9), and October (17). There have been 185 authenticated unprovoked shark attacks reported from the Pacific Coast of North America from 1900 to 2013. The Great White Shark was positively identified or highly suspect in 161 (87%) of the 185 cases. There were 8 fatal shark attacks confirmed from 1900 to 1999 and 5 fatal attacks reported from 2000 to 2013. The 13 fatal attacks represent 7% of the 185 total cases.

Victim activity for the 77 shark attacks reported from the Pacific Coast since 2000 are distributed in the following ocean user groups; surfers 51 (66%) of the documented attacks, with 6 swimmers (8%), 9 kayakers (12%), 4 divers (5%), 4 paddle boarders (5%), 1 windsurfer (1%), 1 fishing (1%), and 1 boogie boarder (1%). The number of shark-bitten stranded marine mammals reported in 2013 was greater than the prior year, especially in Santa Barbara County. The location and time of year, would suggest an increase in the number of Great White Sharks utilizing those specific areas, however, this might not be the result of an increase in their population but rather locations being targeted by sharks migrating to northern regions. The Shark Research Committee will continue to closely monitor these activities.

 

Bodega Bay   —  On January 18, 2014 Lynn Wood was walking along the beach at Bodega Bay. Wood reported;“The sun was just coming up with a clear sky and a temperature of about 60 degrees Fahrenheit. I saw something lying on the beach. As I got closer I realized it was a shark, about 2 ½ feet in length, lying on its side. It was motionless and looked lifeless. As I came upon the shark, vultures and seagulls were picking at it sporadically. My friend tried to pick it up by the tail, but its mouth started to move, and she quickly placed it back on the sand. The tide was coming in, and we expect it took the shark back out to sea. The attached photo of the shark.” The shark is a juvenile salmon shark, Lamna ditropis, that can be found stranded on California beaches throughout the year. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

San Onofre State Beach   —  On January 19, 2014 Dave Schulte was observing the surf a little North of Trail One, San Onofre State Beach. It was 1:00 PM and the air and water temperatures were estimated at 70 and 59 degrees Fahrenheit, respectively. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Schulte reported;“I was on the bluff above an area known as ‘Echo Arch' just North of Trail One. While observing the surf conditions I saw a juvenile Great White Shark, about 5 feet in length, breach as it was heading North just outside the surf line about 50 yards from shore. Water visibility was 10 feet as I could easily observe the shark from my vantage point. I stayed another 15 minutes and saw it only briefly as it surfaced in the same area for a brief moment, then sounded.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Santa Barbara   —  On January 5, 2014 Peter Howorth of the Santa Barbara Marine Mammal Center reported the following;“We recovered an adult harbor seal approximately 0.4 miles east of Arroyo Burro Beach. The seal had been killed and mostly eaten by a juvenile white shark. All of its skin, muscle tissue and blubber, along with virtually all of its internal organs, had been consumed. Some skin was left on its head and hind flippers. From tooth marks on the remaining skin, we could positively determine the identity of the shark. We estimate that the attack occurred sometime earlier today since fresh blood was present and no decomposition had begun. From the severity of the wounds and the fact that the seal was mostly eaten, we believe that the attack occurred within a few miles at most of the location where the carcass drifted ashore. Harbor seals are seen throughout this region, with a few always around the harbor and on the rocks at low tide off More Mesa.” Photograph courtsey of Paul Stark, SBMMC volunteer. Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

Ocean Beach   —  On January 4, 2014 Jeffrey Wolfert was surfing at Ocean Beach, San Francisco. It was 7:30 AM and he had been on the water about 20 minutes. The sky was clear with a brisk breeze and an estimated air temperature in the 50s Fahrenheit. There was a wind and ground swell over a sandy ocean bottom 15 feet deep and an estimated water temperature in the upper 40s Fahrenheit. No marine mammals were observed in the area. Wolfert recalled;“While sitting on my board waiting for a set I saw a triangular shaped dorsal fin pop up about 30 yards away. It cruised across the surface for about 15 yards toward me and another surfer, then submerged out of sight. I saw no other part of the shark.” Please report any shark sighting, encounter, or attack to the Shark Research Committee.

 

 

 


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